Impact of my Research

The impact of a scholarly agenda can be measured in a variety of ways.  One piece of direct evidence of the impact of my research is citations by others of my published works.  Below I provide a table showing total number of citations and citations per year for selected works (Data derived from Google Scholar, accessed September 7th, 2013, http://scholar.google.com/citations?hl=en&user=89zGrloAAAAJ).  I have sorted the table by number of citations per year.  Using this metric, my 2005 edited volume on archaeological approaches to mortuary remains is having the greatest impact with just over 3 citations per year.  I am pleased to see that my 2001 co-edited volume on style and function in archaeology and 1998 monograph from the CAA press each show robust numbers of citations.  My 2009 single-authored book on Casas Grandes mortuary ritual already has 8 citations.  A review of these 8 citations shows that my work is being cited in important venues in my field including the Journal of Anthropological Archaeology and American Antiquity.

Publication & Publisher or Venue

Year of Publication

Years since published

Total Citations

Citations per year

Rakita et al (UPF)

2005

8

25

3.13

Hurt & Rakita (Bergin & Garvey)

2001

12

25

2.08

Rakita (AltaMira Press)

2009

4

8

2.00

Buikstra et al. (CAA Press)

1998

15

28

1.87

Rakita (PhD Dissertation)

2001

12

18

1.50

Buikstra et al. (in UPF volume)

2005

8

11

1.38

Lozada et al. (in Mosley volume)

2009

4

5

1.25

Rakita & Buikstra (SAA volume)

2008

5

6

1.20

Hurt et al (in Bergin & Garvey vol.)

2001

12

9

0.75

Rakita & Buikstra (in UPF volume)

2005

8

5

0.63

Rakita & Raymond (in Kiva)

2003

10

4

0.40

Hurt et al (in American Antiquity)

2001

12

4

0.33

Rakita (in Latin American Antiquity)

2001

12

1

0.08

Indirect evidence of the significance of my scholarship and my reputation within my field include requests for me to serve as a reviewer of others’ scholarly work.  Since promotion I have been asked to review three separate grant proposals by the National Science Foundation.  Throughout my career I have been asked to peer-review 15 manuscripts (8 since promotion) for various journals including: Advances in Archaeological Practice, American Antiquity, International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, Journal of Anthropological Research, and Latin American Antiquity.  I have twice been invited to serve as a discussant for symposia held at the Society for American Archaeology meetings.  This year I have been asked to serve as external reviewer of two colleagues going up for promotion and tenure at other universities.  I serve as an external member of two Ph.D. dissertation committees.  In October of 2012 I was invited to participate in a seminar on Casas Grandes prehistory at the Amerind Foundation (an Anthropological think-tank) in Arizona.  The previous summer I was invited to present my research at a symposium at the 54th International Congress of Americanists in Vienna.  Finally, I was selected to serve as program chair for the national meetings of the Society for American Archaeology an honor that indicates that my disciplinary colleagues trust my decisions regarding the quality of their proposed presentations and how those presentations should be grouped and scheduled.

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